Seid and Saman, two young lives suffocated by tangles of racism, patriarchal fundamentalism and globalisation

Seid and Saman, two young lives suffocated by tangles of racism, patriarchal fundamentalism and globalisation

IS AN EPOCH-MAKING EMERGENCY TO BE GOVERNED
THE ITALIAN MODEL OF INTEGRATING FOREIGNERS
NEEDS TO BE RECONFIGURED
WE ASK FORGIVENESS OF SAMAN AND SEID

Saman Abbas

The tragic story of the young Pakistani girl, Saman Abbas, who had just turned 18, concerns us all very closely. Saman, according to the results of the investigations carried out, is believed to be dead, killed by her uncle with the consent of the rest of her family, because she did not agree to return to Pakistan to enter into an arranged marriage. We are faced with yet another feminicide, the result of a mix of fundamentalisms (religious and cultural), often rooted in the first generations of immigrants and that, in the name of a value considered vital – honour – sows pain and death, failing to go beyond the primacy of force, submission and prevarication exercised on women.

Seid Visin

SEID VISIN, originally from Ethiopia, enthusiastically adopted, at the age of seven, by a family from Nocera Inferiore (SA) killed himself at the age of 20, despite his many talents.  He was ‘lost’, despite the affection of friends and family, in the tangles of the Italian model of integration of foreigners: full of contradictions and, for this reason, said to be ‘ambivalent’ (Ambrosini). Pampered as a child, despised as an adult because of the colour of his skin.

His words, written a couple of years ago, in the midst of an existential crisis…

Faced with this particular socio-political scenario in Italy, I, as a black person, inevitably feel called into question. I am not an immigrant. I was adopted when I was a child. Before this great migratory flow, I remember with some arrogance that everyone loved me. Wherever I was, wherever I went, wherever I was, everyone addressed me with great joy, respect and curiosity. Now, however, this atmosphere of idyllic peace seems so far away; it seems as if mystically everything has been turned upside down, winter seems to have descended on me with extreme impetuosity and vehemence, without warning, on a clear spring day. Now, wherever I go, wherever I am, wherever I am, I feel on my shoulders, like a boulder, the weight of people’s sceptical, prejudiced, disgusted and frightened looks. A few months ago I managed to find a job which I had to leave because too many people, mainly elderly people, refused to be served by me and, as if that were not enough, as if I did not already feel uncomfortable, they also blamed me for the fact that many young (white) Italians could not find work”.

JUSTICE MADE UP OF REDISTRIBUTION AND
REDISTRIBUTION AND RECOGNITION